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The Results of “Milk Jug Sowing” are in…!

Hi everyone! It’s me, Jess. It’s been awhile since I’ve been able to connect with you on the blog. For those of you that don’t know, my full-time job is being an elementary teacher. I’ve been really busy wrapping up the end of the school year and trying to stay flexible with the crazy spring planting season we have had. But on top of all that, I accepted a new teaching position at our local lutheran school, which just so happens to be where my kids attend. Yay! So I packed up my classroom and said goodbye to the many friendships and memories that I have made, fully knowing that the next chapter will be filled with opportunities to make new friends and new memories. 

In-between all these adventures, I managed to squeeze in a little time to do some gardening. I don’t really consider gardening as another task to do, but rather what I do to ground myself, get out of my busy head and allow myself the time and space needed to feel relaxed and rejuvenated. Gardening might just be one of my favorite summer pastimes because there is something so therapeutic about it! This is a quote I found that just happens to sum it up perfectly: We might think we are nurturing our garden, but of course it’s our garden that is really nurturing us – Jenny Uglow. Anyone else feel this way? 
Well, a while back on the blog I did a post about milk jug sowing (because I was VERY eager for spring) and I thought it was about time that I gave you all an update! I am pleased to say that I will be doing this method again next year and I still think you should, too! Below I have a few pictures of some of the results.

Some plants did extremely well and thrived on this method, while others didn’t quite make the cut. But this project was so inexpensive that a little trial and error didn’t matter. 

Tomatoes, carrots, lettuce, and zinnias were some of the plants that established great roots to be transplanted in my garden. Soapbox Moment: I want to remind you again just how easy this method is. I didn’t have to worry about watering or sunlight. I simply placed them outside somewhere safe (in recycled milk jugs) from the wind and once they sprouted I remembered to cover them up when the evening temps dropped. Give it a try next year!

Now excuse me while I head outside to water these beauties… It’s only supposed to reach 100 degrees on Monday, so I’m going to stay on top of my water game!

Let us know other methods that you have tried for gardening or something exciting that you planted this year. We’d love to hear it! Thank you for following along with us. 

Rooted in ag and led by faith
Jess

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